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Insects & Disease Resources

Ambrosia Beetles in tree trunk

Ambrosia Beetles

Ambrosia beetles attack weakened, dying, and recently cut trees. There are many different species of ambrosia beetle. A sign of Ambrosia beetles is the sawdust (frass) they create on the stem of the tree or at the base of the tree. Look for frass being pushed away from the bark creating delicate tubes that look like toothpicks protruding from the plant’s bark. Sap or resin may also flow from the wounds. Dead or dying branches or sections may also be apparent.

Treatment recommendation is if seeing any signs of the above, a bark applied systemic insecticide should be applied.

Tea scale on shrub leaves

Tea Scale

Tea scale is a white armored scale insect that is a major pest of hollies and camellias. Tea scales can produce multiple generations a year making them hard to control. They are found on the undersides of the foliage. Damage is most apparent in the top of the leaf surface as yellow blotches. Once damage is done it will stay on the leaf surface. In some cases, tea scale can cause premature leaf drop and die back.

Treatment recommendation is to apply foliar insecticide treatment along with a horticultural oil treatment in the winter.

White flies on a gardenia plant leaves

White Flies

Whiteflies are small white flies that attack certain species of plants on your landscape, the most common of these plants is the gardenia. Whiteflies use their piercing mouthparts to suck up plant juices. Then they produce a sticky substance known as honeydew. The honeydew left on the leaves will then turn black procuring sooty mold. With heavy whitefly feeding, plants will quickly become extremely weak and may be unable to carry out photosynthesis.

Treatment recommendation Is to use foliar insecticide sprays during the growing season in combination with a soil systemic in the fall or winter.

Tree with too much mulch around the base

Over-mulching

Too much mulch applied around the base of a tree can create problems for the tree. Roots often grow up and into the mulch causing stem girdling that can kill the tree (see below).
Stem girdling at base of tree

Girdling Roots

Girdling roots are roots that grow up and into at least one side of the tree trunk. These roots damage the tree restricting the movement of water and nutrients to the leaves. If not treated, the affected tree may eventually die.
Branch crossing on mature tree

Branch Crossing

Crossed branches can be prevented by proper pruning techniques while the tree is young.
Lecanium Scale Insects on a tree branch

Lecanium

Lecanium Scale Insects on a tree branch.
Phytophthora Canker at base of tree

Phytophthora Canker

Phytophthora canker produces a characteristic oozing of darkened sap on bark surface. The fluid is typically reddish-brown and it stains the surrounding bark as it flows downward. It can also smell like ethanol or rotting apples attracting slugs, bees and other insects. The Phytophthora species that cause bleeding canker originate from the soil and may be causing root disease. In addition to bleeding canker, the fungus thrives in wet soil.

Treatment recommendation is if the root flare of your trees is not visible, remove soil and mulch from around base of tree. Bark applications of systemic fungicides will help to arrest further development of the disease.

Advance Tree & Shrub removes a large beehive hanging from a tree branch.

Beehive Removal

Large beehive hanging from a tree branch being safely removed by the Advance Tree & Shrub Team.

Do you have concerns about the trees and/or shrubs on your property?

Advance Tree & Shrub uses INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (IPM) to assess pest and disease problems on your property. IPM simply refers to a process used to solve pest problems while minimizing risks to people and the environment. We use products that will be most effective against the task at hand and least harmful to you and your family. By having a Certified Arborist as our Chief Operator for Advance Tree & Shrub, we can ensure our customers get top-quality and correct identification backed with a certified license.

Contact Advance Tree & Shrub

(919) 569-0555

AdvanceTreeShrub@gmail.com

PO Box 511, Wake Forest, NC 27588

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